cardiomyocyte
Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers
Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Mar 7, 2018
Researchers created a nanofibrous scaffold to see how it supports cell growth.
Image of the Day: Transformers
Image of the Day: Transformers
The Scientist Staff | Feb 10, 2017
These facial muscle cells were genetically reprogrammed into beating heart cells.
Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells
Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells
Kerry Grens | Jun 1, 2016
Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.
The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch
The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch
Amanda B. Keener | Jun 1, 2016
In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.
In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism
In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism
Amanda B. Keener | Jun 1, 2016
While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.
Mysterious Mechanisms of Cardiac Cell Therapy
Mysterious Mechanisms of Cardiac Cell Therapy
Kerry Grens | Feb 4, 2016
Injections of progenitor cells into damaged rat hearts may improve function, but not because the implants themselves are creating new muscle.
Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate
Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate
Kerry Grens | Oct 27, 2015
Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.
New Data Attempt to Resolve Protein Dispute
New Data Attempt to Resolve Protein Dispute
Kerry Grens | Oct 22, 2015
The latest analysis on GDF11, a proposed antiaging protein, blames discrepancies in the literature on misreported doses and misinterpretation.
Gel Heals Heart Attack Injury
Gel Heals Heart Attack Injury
Kerry Grens | Sep 18, 2015
A collagen patch seeded with a regenerative protein helps mice and pigs regain cardiac function after a heart attack.
Next Generation: Cell-Covered Fastener
Next Generation: Cell-Covered Fastener
Ruth Williams | Aug 28, 2015
Scientists have developed an interlocking cell scaffold for easy building and dismantling of tissues.